September 16th, 2021

WW1 Grave

As Ever, Yesterday Got Away From Me!

Actually what with work in the morning (and despite the leg being strapped, it was sore), after lunch I then went to the cememtery where Mum & Dad are resting.  No, not  to see them but to go on a guided walk with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.  I will admit that much I heard I already knew, but was amazed to find that Bram Stoker's brother George is one of the casualties from WWI buried in the cemetery.  He was a doctor, who had also served in the Zulu and Boer wars ... sadly he then caught flu, having served in the trenches ... so that was sadly how he ended up passing away.

The rest of the tour gave odd comments about some who had served and died during the 2 World Wars.  I was also able to meet one of the men who is going to be doing my training for the grave cleaning volunteering that I am going to do.  So it was good to meet him, as well as confirm the training date for a few weeks time. 

But with everything it was much later by the time I got back here.

Now I have done another morning at work, and had the odd thing of one patient being booked in by another receptionist and sent to sit at the wrong end of the hospital.  Obviously that receptionist was having a total brain-storm ... but luckily our receptionist was able to ring him and get him to where he should be.  She also contacted the other person ... but didn't hear back as to why or how that happened.  Oh well, it keeps me on my toes!!

Well i must sort out some more photos for you, but, as ever -



15. Do you think doctors should be able to prescribe vitamins?
My doctor, many years ago, prescribed vitamin B tablets and for many years Mum was prescribed vitamin D ... so can't see the point of this question!

16. If you have a significant other, how long have you been together?
N/A
James - totally fascinated

WWII History

As I said, I went to the Island of Jersey for a week to explore the island, but also to see the wwii history.  The one place in Britain that had German occupation.

On the first day we went to the War Tunnels, built by slave labour.  It was used mostly for storage, and for a hospital.  Ironically for me it was important that I saw that.  The father of the doctor who delivered me had actually been a doctor on Jersey during the war, and had worked in the tunnels in the operating theatre.  Mum had problems when I was born, and apparantly it took the doctor over an hour to stitch her up.  They chatted, and Jersey came up as it was where Mum & Dad had their honeymoon.

It now has various displays, to do with it's use.

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Our group getting ready to go in -
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The hospital -
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Some of the many unfinished tunnels -
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Sadly, a typical residents menu -
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Due to the situation, many things were non-existant ... things like bicycle tyres were made with hose pipes
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After the Normandy landings in france, Jersey (and the rest of the islands) were cut off.  Churchill aimed to starve the Germans out ... but sadly that meant that everyone was starved.  In the end they did have a couple of Red Cross liberty ships in to help.
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After going to the tunnels, we went to St Brelaide for lunch, and then a walk round the village to see soem more history -
The hotel where we had lunch ... and during the war was used by the Germans for weekend breaks.  There were 2 on the island, and the other was the hotel we were staying at.  So 1940 - 1945 it was called - Soldatenheim 2
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One other place we saw was this 13th century Chapel -
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It must have looked stunning when you realise how much remains 700 years later -
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Some of the Atlantic Wall - built during the occupation to protect the island from invasion
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