February 19th, 2018

James - Discovery Channel

Now It's Time To Catch Up

Jiffy and I had a great time away (photos to follow), but today is back to life as normal.

So, worked this morning, and will admit have had a rest this afternoon before turning on the pc ... I try to be a good girl and not push myself when I feel my body saying no.

And so, I must catch up with the February Meme, and get my icons finished, and posted, to character20n20

February 17 - If you could go back in time and ask one person one question, what would it be?

Like many I have loads of questions I wish I had asked my parents, and I thought I knew the answers for them all!! However, that isn't this question ... so ...

I would ask my great-grandfather which was the favourite city he lived in (yes in the 1870 - 1900's) he lived in 2 cities in USA, one in Canada, and 4 in England). My grandma was born in Toronto.

February 18 - Who was your first real crush?

Mark S. I sat next to him when I was 9, and really liked him from then. Typical of me, he was the most popular boy in the class, and as the years progressed, the one who always had a girl-friend!

February 19 - If you could ask the country’s founding fathers one question, what would it be?

First I have to work out who that is!!! I suppose it would possibly be Edward the Confessor (c. 1003 – 5 January 1066), also known as Saint Edward the Confessor, was among the last Anglo-Saxon kings of England. Usually considered the last king of the House of Wessex, he ruled from 1042 to 1066. The son of Æthelred the Unready and Emma of Normandy, Edward succeeded Cnut the Great's son – and his own half brother – Harthacnut, restoring the rule of the House of Wessex after the period of Danish rule since Cnut (better known as Canute) conquered England in 1016. When Edward died in 1066, he was succeeded by Harold Godwinson, who was defeated and killed in the same year by the Normans under William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.) Gradually England became one country, rather than a selection of kingdoms.

So, my question would be - After 20+ years of rule, and a strengthened country, do you not think that you should have had a son to pass on this heritage. (What a different England we would have!!)


PS - I will answer comments soon, I promise
Family

Holiday - February 2018 (1)

I had a great trip with Jiffy, driving up to Northamptonshire, mainly to visit my Aunt, but while there did some other sightseeing.



 photo DSC_0192_zpssncngmge.jpg

 photo DSC_0188_zpsyxd6ap5u.jpg

Auntie Mary was Mum's best friend, and has always been an amazing Aunt to all 3 of us.  It was lovely to suprise her, and spend much of the day with her ... and, as you can see, Jiffy was very happy in his visit as well.

As we were leaving (Auntie Mary was recovering from a bad cold), Jiffy & I had a walk round the village that she lives in -

Collapse )
Mum

Holiday - February 2018 (2) .... Stanwick

I had 2 reasons for going to Northants this weekend. Firstly to visit Auntie Mary but also to visit as it would have been Mum's 90th birthday. So I wanted to do some sight-seeing of the village of Stanwick I knew as a kid. Until I was 18/19 we used to go up every 6 weeks, or so.

Collapse )


When Mum was a kid, and in fact as I remember it, the village was surrounded by fields. However they have made a nature reserve there ... and Jiffy and I visited it in the afternoon -

Collapse )
Spitfire

Holiday - February 2018 (3) .... Raunds & Chelveston

On the same day that we went to Stanwick, we also went to Raunds, to see the Church, and hopefully the cemetery to see my other set of great-grandparents (however there was absolutely no parking there, so we just went to The Church) ....

My grandfather was born here in 1896, and christened in St Peter's Church .. so worth a visit!

Collapse )

I grew up knowing about RAF Chelveston, as an American base during the war. Mum actually saw Glenn Miller there and it gave her a love of band music, that she passed on.

During the Second World War the airfield was occupied by both the Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Forces. It was given the USAAF designation Station 105.

In early 1942, Chelveston was turned over to the American Eighth Air Force. The first USAAF unit to occupy Chelveston was the 60th Troop Carrier Group. The 60th consisted of the 10th, 11th, 12th and 26th squadrons, equipped with 53 C-47 aircraft. On 9 August 1942, the 301st Bombardment Group (Heavy) took up residence on the station. The 301st was assigned to the 1st Combat Wing at Brampton Grange. Its operational squadrons were the 32d, 352d, 353d, 354th and 415th Bomb Squadrons, each equipped with Boeing B-17F Flying Fortresses. USAAF Station Units assigned to RAF Chelveston were:
442d Sub-Depot[2]
18th Weather Squadron
2d Station Complement Squadron
1059th Military Police Company
1632nd Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Company
876th Chemical Company (Air Operations)
2030th Engineer Fire Fighting Platoon
5th Mobile Training Unit
309th Medical Dispensary

During the war this, and 2 other airfields would circle over Stanwick, while getting into formation ... sadly 2 planes miss-timed on one occasion while Mum was outside, and almost killed by having her lungs collapsed by the force of the explosion. Someone saw her fall down, and came and thumped her on the back, which meant she took a deap breath in.

In 2007 a memorial was made to celebrate the American heritageCollapse )
Stone sculpture

Holiday - February 2018 (4) .... Lyveden New Bield

It was constructed for Sir Thomas Tresham, a fervent Roman Catholic, and is thought to have been designed by Robert Stickells. The exact date is unknown but can be estimated to circa 1604–05, the year of Tresham's death. It wasn't finished by this time, and as Robert Catesby was a cousin, the family lost everything after the Gunpowder Plot was discovered.

Lyveden New Build is built in a cross shape, with a lot of religious images carved in place.

A century later stone had been attempted to remove, but due to the amazing workmanship, that proved impossible, so the building was preserved to this day.

Collapse )